Gone to Seed

July in the Wildflower Garden- Mesa, AZ

“I shivered in those solitudes when I heard the voice of the salt in the desert.” 

― Pablo Neruda

Hot dry winds and scorching sun 
beating hardy wildflowers down
Only stalwart dandelions and a few stray blooms 
survive in this searing summer heat~

And as another stormy season 
of monsoons roar across the arid desert 
gone all too soon, vibrant colorful blooms 
that danced in an errant spring wind  
so all that’s left are brittle drying stalks 
and alien pods going to tender seed
to be spread when a wayward evening breeze 
sets them afloat into humid night air
to land somewhere they will call home
and blossom with life all over again

©2021 Linda Lee Lyberg

dVerse Poets Pub: Poetics

Linda Lee Lyberg is a wife, mother, artist, published poet and author. She resides in Mesa, AZ with her husband Pete (aka The Big Viking) of 24 years and their latest rescue, Jackson “Jax” Lyberg. Linda writes various forms of poetry, as well as short stories. You can read more of her works at: charmedchaos.com and view anthologies containing her work here: Amazon Author Page

36 Comments on “Gone to Seed

  1. i love how you point out that there is new life – even in the fading.. nature seems to have a tough time this summer – either it’s scorching hot or way too wet…

    Liked by 1 person

  2. This is rather like the cycle of Life a death and receding rebirth. Have lived through some of the monsoons over in Nepal and it gives a whole new meaning to the word gully washers. But that too can carry the seed on to the next place where New Life Will bloom. Nice verse.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. How beautiful to picture the dry desert blossoming with life! You must have been thankful for the rain. We have a thunderstorm raging right now after a week of high temperatures.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you Ingrid. Anytime there is rain here, I am so thankful. When the storm came through the other night, we sat out on the back patio and watched the lightning flash across the sky. It was wonderful.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. The weather has been so odd this year.. sweltering hot and humid .. I love the poignancy with which this poem is penned, Linda 💝💝

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I am always so thankful to inhabit my northeastern verdancy. I try to be mindful of those who wake to much less green. Your work here, Linda, reminds me that all things are one. Fine work indeed.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I swear I can see the rabbits nibbling at the stalks. I bet a pleasant fragrance still rises from the garden. The plant on the upper right is pretty, what is that? I like that shade of green.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. I love Arizona in monsoon season! Love. We are struggling today with heat/smoke, the necessity of closing our windows/doors. Using our AC. Ugh.

    I love your garden animals …. we have one rabbit we’ve named Flossie.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Excellent piece Linda. Enjoyable read. I love the desert, the red rocks of Sedona AZ being a favorite area. I lived in Tucson AZ for a year in 1970. Landed there after me and my three best friends, rode our Triumph 650 Bonneville motorcycles from Cincinnati OH, out to Dream Canyon commune in Bolder CO, then down along the Rockies, stopping at a commune outside SantaFe — finally to Tucson, to stay at a commune in Oracle AZ. That was my Easy Rider year — prior to my first marriage. Remember well those driving desert rains, flooding the concrete ravines to rampant rivers — gone as quickly as they came. Sorry I rambled Linda, with this memory download.

    Liked by 1 person

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